The Occasional Vegan

I’ve written a book! It’s not every day you can say that, is it? After months of recipe testing and writing, The Occasional Vegan is here and I’m finally feeling confident enough to blow my own trumpet, just a little bit. A hell of a lot of work went into it (what’s the vegan equivalent of blood, sweat and tears?) so yes, I’m feeling pretty happy at the moment.

Since it was published last week, I’ve been busy doing media interviews and trying to fit in all my freelance work at the same time. It’s an exciting time, although I’m a pick and mix bagful of excited and nervous about the launch event next month. If you want to come along, you can get your free ticket here.

Over the next week or so, I’ll be hopping onto other people’s blogs and, so far, I’ve been on Eat Happy and For the Love of Hygge, where I talk about taking a balanced approach to eating. That’s one of the reasons I wrote this book: to prove that being vegan can be about having your cake and eating it. It’s not all rabbit food (or ‘clean eating’, whatever that actually means) and you certainly indulge in the occasional treat, because ditching the meat and dairy doesn’t mean that you have to miss out.

I want to inspire people to cook vegan dishes, whatever their budget or lifestyle, so the book is divided into four sections, which you dip and out of, depending on the occasion.

  1. The working week: quick and easy breakfasts, lunches and dinners
  2. Something for the weekend: lazy brunches, lunches and meals for friends and family
  3. High days and holidays: dishes for special occasions
  4. Comfort food and childhood favourites: think cawl, lasagne and chocolate brownies

As you’ll see when you read the book, there is so much variety in the vegan way of eating. Go forth and cook!

If you want to see me channelling my inner Nigella (I wish), you can watch a video of me making KFC (that’s Kentucky fried cauliflower), which is one of my favourite recipes from the book. It was filmed by Manon Houston, who also took all the photographs for the book. If you need a food photographer and stylist, check her out; she’s super talented and is great fun to work with.

For a taster of The Occasional Vegan, here’s an exclusive recipe from the book. This tofu dish is all sorts of delicious and the sticky lemon glaze is a dream come true. Why bother with a takeaway when you can make this instead?

 

Lemon tofu and fried rice

StickyLemonTofu
Lemon tofu and fried rice

As a child, Chinese food was a big treat and every once in a while, Mum would come home with a couple of oven meals from Marks and Spencer. It was only when I got older that I tried the takeaway kind, but for me, it was way too greasy.

I loved umami flavours from a young age, so sweet and sour sauce was a firm favourite but what I remember the most is lemon chicken. This is a vegan version of that with fried rice. When life gives you lemons, make this.

50-55 minutes, plus time for preparing the tofu

Serves 2

Ingredients

 

For the lemon tofu

1 x 400g block firm tofu

1 yellow pepper, cut into thin strips

The juice of 4 lemons

1 tbsp flour

1 tbsp soy sauce

4 tsps sugar

1 tbsp sesame oil

 

For the fried rice

125g brown rice

100g peas, fresh or frozen

1 tbsp sesame oil

 

Take the tofu and use kitchen roll or a clean tea towel to blot and absorb all its water. Take a heavy wooden chopping board or a hardback book and place it on top of the wrapped tofu. This will press down on it and absorb excess moisture. Leave for 30 minutes then slice into medium-sized strips.

Preheat the oven to 200C and in an oven-proof dish, mix the soy sauce, flour and juice from two of the lemons. Coat both sides of the tofu strips with the mixture and leave to marinate for 15 minutes then bake for 25-30 minutes, turning every so often.

Meanwhile, rinse and drain the rice and add to a pan of cold water. Bring to the boil and cook for 20 minutes then drain. In a large pan or wok, heat the sesame oil and add the rice and peas and fry for ten minutes.

Remove the tofu from the oven. Mix together the remainder of the lemon juice, the sugar and the sesame oil and heat in a large pan. Add the sliced pepper and fry for a minute or two before adding the tofu. Cook for another 5-6 minutes until the tofu is glazed in the sauce, then serve with the fried rice.

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The Swigg

Well, haven’t we had a strange start to March? Sub-zero temperatures and snow-covered cars aren’t quite what one expects as spring approaches but there we go. As much as I pretend to hate the white stuff, I was more than a little disappointed that it didn’t stick around in Swansea. Apparently, it never snows here. The rest of the country, however, was a different story, and Cardiff was covered in the stuff. Instagram was full of friends and their frosty frolics, giving me a serious case of FOMO and a proper hiraeth for my home city.

But anyway, Swansea’s getting more familiar by the day and I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the food scene, and especially what’s on offer for us vegans. One of my favourite places is The Swigg, a cwtchy but cool café bar that’s right on the marina and serves up small plates inspired by the flavours of Wales and faraway places. It won ‘Welsh Eatery of the Year 2017’ in the Welsh Independent Retail Awards and all the ingredients are sourced as locally as possible.

While there’s plenty of meat and fish on the menu, there are also some delicious dishes for veggies and vegans: think Glamorgan sausages, quinoa sushi and houmous with roasted garlic and lemon.

There’s also a monthly vegan night where you can feast on six small plates for the bargain price of £25 per person and last week I was invited to pop over and try the menu. It may have been cold outside but it was all cosy and twinkly inside and I soon warmed up with a glass of red. The other half arrived a little late, snow swept and a little flustered. He’d walked all the way the way into town in the snow despite a heavy cold; what a wise man he is.

Anyway, let’s talk about the food. First up was the tomato and courgette ‘pizza’, a bite-sized feast of fresh flavours. This was followed by the Port Eynon sea salt baked celeriac with Gower cabbage and a smattering of pomegranate seeds. It was the night before St David’s Day so there was bit of a Welsh theme to the menu and this was sweetly salty and sumptuous, rather unlike our patron saint I’d imagine. Did you know that he was a vegetarian, though?

Next up was the three bean chilli which was on the just the right side of spicy and served with wild rice, a drizzle of vegan yogurt and a wedge of lime. After all those big flavours, it was time for a palate cleanser and the carrot, parsley and lemon salad did the job, but was still pleasantly fragrant.

Time for the star of the show. The miso tofu, mushroom and laverbread was next level umami and the small portion meant that this luxurious little number wasn’t too overpowering for the taste buds. We ended the meal with a the most perfect of puddings: a quince, apple and nut crumble.

It was a great way to try tasty but unpretentious food in a warm and friendly atmosphere and we’ll definitely be back. Apologies for my less than impressive photographs, but you I think you’ll agree that these are some good looking plates of food.

 

 

 

The Swigg holds its next vegan-themed night on Thursday 29 March.Visit the website for more details.

The Swigg

Swansea Marina, SA1 3RD

http://www.theswigg.net