Spring fever

We’re slowly inching away from the cold, dark months of winter, but I’m not quite full of the joys of spring. That could be because it’s been rainy and windy for the last three days or because I’ve been feeling rundown and unwell, but I don’t think that’s it.

Maybe I just need some pie. It’s British Pie Week, another week for another foodstuff, but if there was ever a time for comfort food, this is it. While Brexit rages on, climate change is more apparent than ever (hello, February heatwave) and the number of students in the UK learning a foreign language has nearly halved. Personally, I think our governments need a generous slice of humble pie.

Over the past few months, freelancing has started to chip away at my general wellbeing and I’m starting to wonder whether it’s all it’s cracked up to be. It’s great to have freedom, but that’s not much compensation when you’re chasing yet another outstanding invoice and trying to keep your many ‘bosses’ sweet. If you like structure, this isn’t the life for you.

I thought self-employment would mean endless coffee dates but most of my friends live in Cardiff and I just don’t have the time most weeks. When I do meet a pal during the day, it’s almost guaranteed that an ‘urgent’ email will come through, and when any work is money, it’s hard to say no.  If I do take a break for a few hours to catch up with a friend or go to the gym or for a walk, it feels like I’m mitching from school, and I’m constantly checking my phone to make sure that I haven’t missed anything. It’s difficult to enjoy yourself when you feel that you should be working.

So, work is busy but life is pretty quiet when you don’t go have a 9-5 office job. Some days, my only interactions are with Bobbie, our kitten, the staff at the Starbucks across the road (haters gonna hate, but there isn’t an independent coffee shop nearby and sometimes I need to get out of the flat to work) or the occasional work-related phone call.

Happily, I’m working on a few food-related projects, but they don’t pay the bills, so I don’t always have that much time (or money) to cook fancy meals or eat out. And as I’ve mentioned before, I live with a pair of fussy eaters, who don’t like anything out of the ordinary, which is why I like to have friends over for dinner!

Sure, I get asked to try vegan food at restaurants in return for a blog or Instagram post (and I realise that’s a pretty jammy situation to be in), but I turn down as many invitations as I accept because I can’t justify taking time out my working day to travel to Cardiff just for a meal.

Anyway, it’s British Pie Week (not an ad), and by sheer coincidence I baked a pie using up leftovers from the fridge just last week. This one’s really simple to make, especially as it uses ready-made pastry. All you need to do is prepare the filling cover with pastry and pop it in the oven. Mine came out looking a little less than perfect (all my food looks rustic when it’s unfiltered) but it was very tasty. Food for the soul indeed.

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Celeriac, kale and chickpea pie. Rustic cooking (and photography) at its finest.

Celeriac, kale and chickpea pie

Serves 4

 

Ingredients

1 medium sized celeriac (about 200g), peeled and diced

100g kale, rinsed and roughly chopped or torn

1 x 400g can chickpeas, rinsed and drained (keep the water!)

½ an apple, cored and diced

2 cloves garlic, peeled and grated or finely chopped

A couple of sprigs of  fresh rosemary, chopped (or use dry)

2 tsp wholegrain mustard

The juice of ½ a lemon

200ml plant milk (oat milk works particularly well)

2 tsp nutritional yeast (optional)

Salt and pepper

2 tbsp rapeseed, coconut or vegetable oil

1 sheet (320g) Jus-Rol or supermarket own brand shortcrust pastry sheet (take out of the fridge 45 minutes before making the pie)

 

Preheat your oven to 200C. In a large pan, heat the oil over a medium temperature and fry the celeriac for 5 minutes. Add the rosemary and garlic and fry for another 2-3 minutes, until golden. Add the apple and kale and pour over the lemon juice. Cook for 2-3 minutes, then pour over the milk and stir through the mustard and nutritional yeast, if using. Add the chickpeas (pour the water from the can into a mug or bowl and set aside) and season, then cover with a lid and cook on a low temperature for another 5-10 minutes.

Take the pastry out of its packet and gently unroll and drape over a medium-sized ovenproof dish or pie dish. Make sure to press down the pastry and cover the sides of the dish, then spoon in the pie filling. Take the loose ends of the pastry to form a ‘lid’ and press down together. Now, using a pastry brush, ‘paint’ over some of the chickpea water across the pastry lid.

Place the dish on the middle shelf of the oven and bake for 30-35 minutes. Serve with mashed potato or swede and lots of veggies, or enjoy cold with salad.