Scary spice

October has crept past me and all of a sudden, the clocks have gone back and it’s Halloween. The past four weeks have been a bit of a blur after a short stint of working nine to five in Cardiff. While I enjoyed it (I met some great people, the work was interesting and it gave me a reason to get out of my pyjamas), it was quite a shock to the system after the freedom and flexibility of freelancing. It got me out of the house andI was always paid on time (take note, other companies), but gosh, I was tired. I really don’t miss leaving the house while it was still dark and getting home at 7.30pm. I realise how lucky I am to do what I do.

Although commuting by train from Swansea to Cardiff took up a considerable chunk of the day (thank you, delays), it did mean that, when I wasn’t working, I could sit and watch the world from my window, or just read. I never finish books. Although I’ve always been a bookworm and own piles and piles of paperbacks, it’s rare for me to finish one before starting on another. Call it a short attention span or perhaps it harks back to my English degree when I always had about three books on the go, but I just can’t commit to one.

Well, finally, I’ve settled on one book and I’ve devoured its pages like The Very Hungry Caterpillar. I’m re-reading The Secret History by Donna Tartt, which is my all-time favourite novel. There’s a reason why it’s a cult classic and I’ve loved it ever since I first read it aged 18. For a novel in which the central plot is about a murder, it’s an oddly comforting read (in fact, at uni, I studied it as part of a module called ‘Danger, Domesticity and American Literature’) and the protagonist’s descriptions of fall in New England make me feel all warm and cosy. If you haven’t discovered it yet, you’re in for a treat.

It’s been good for me to slow down my brain, and reading really helps me switch off. While life has been busy, I haven’t had much time to cook, so I’ve been relying on ready meals and batch cooking at the weekends. I’ve always been a fan of one pot meals but they’ve proved especially useful in the past month. This warming curry is another way to use pumpkin and squash this scary season, and it’s pretty easy to make, too. I like the hint of a kick provided by the cardamom – if you’re using the pods, make sure that you remove these before cooking, although you can buy the ground version if it’s easier.

IMG_3059
Pumpkin, lentil and spinach curry with coconut milk and cardamom

Pumpkin, lentil and spinach curry with coconut milk and cardamom

Serves 3-4

Ingredients

1 medium (around 300g) pumpkin or squash, peeled, diced and seeds removed

200g red lentils, rinsed and drained

2 x 400ml cans coconut milk

1 bag (about 250g), fresh spinach (or use frozen)

1 onion, peeled and finely diced

1 heaped teaspoon coconut oil

1 tsp ground turmeric

1 tsp coriander seeds, ground

1 tsp cardamom seeds, ground

2 inches of ginger, peeled and finely chopped or grated

1 clove of garlic, peeled and finely chopped or grated

 

Prepare the pumpkin then in a large pot or saucepan, heat the oil over a low temperature, then add the onion, garlic and spaces and fry for 2 minutes. Add the pumpkin and cook for another 5 minutes. Pour in the coconut milk with the lentils and bring to the boil.

Reduce the heat, cover with a lid and simmer for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the spinach, stir through, and cook for another 2 minutes – or a bit longer if using frozen. Serve with brown rice.

Advertisements

Stranger Things

If, like many a millennial, you spent the weekend devouring season two of Stranger Things, you’ll have seen a lot of pumpkins in the last few days. Even if you don’t watch the cult series (and you really should because even a scaredy cat like me is a fan), you’ve probably passed a windowsill or two with a jagged-toothed jack o’lantern on display.  Whether you heart Halloween or hate it, it’s the time of year to parade those golden globes – and when it’s over, you can turn them into something tasty.

I haven’t had much of a chance to enjoy autumn’s abundance this year because I’ve been too busy recipe testing. Gone are the gorgeous gourds I normally eat during these months as I make room in the kitchen (and my tummy) for lasagne, beetroot bourgignon, cauliflower ‘cheese’, and lots of other lovely things. If you think that sounds delicious, you can pre-order my book here.

In the meantime, pick up a pumpkin (or squash) and try these easy recipes. First up is a bright and sunny salad of roasted swede, pumpkin, broccoli, courgettes, tomatoes and, my favourite, romanesco cauliflower. Then there’s orange and cinnamon roasted pumpkin and sweet potato wedges,  the perfect partner for chilli or a hearty stew. Enjoy.

Autumn salad
All your RDA in one bowl

Autumn salad

Serves 4

Ingredients

1 small pumpkin or squash, peeled and sliced into wedges (remove the pith but keep cook the seeds, if you like)

1 swede, peeled and sliced into wedges

1 head romanesco cauliflower, cut into florets

1 head broccoli, cut into florets

1 punnet cherry or plum tomatoes

Herbs of your choice (fresh or dried)

2-3 tbsp olive oil

½ lemon

Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 200C (gas mark 6). Place the pumpkin and swede in a large ovenproof dish and drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle over some herbs (thyme works well here) and season with salt and pepper. Place on the top shelf of the oven and roast for 10-15 minutes. Now, take another dish and add the cauliflower florets, courgettes and broccoli, drizzle with oil, squeeze over some lemon juice, and season. Place on the middle shelf of the oven and bake for 15 minutes – in the last five minutes, add the tomatoes. When cooked, divide the vegetables onto plates, drizzle with a bit more oil and eat.

Pumpkin and sweet potato wedges
Golden globes

Pumpkin and sweet potato wedges with orange and cinnamon

Serves 3-4

1 small pumpkin or squash, peeled and sliced into wedges (remove the pith but keep cook the seeds, if you like)

2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and sliced into wedges

1 orange

2 tsp cinnamon

2-3 tbsp olive oil

Salt and pepper

Preheat the oven to 200C (gas mark 6). Place the pumpkin and sweet potato wedges in a large ovenproof dish and drizzle with olive oil, then squeeze over the orange juice and sprinkle over the cinnamon. Season, then place on the top shelf of the oven and roast for 30-35 minutes.