Fairtrade Fortnight

Today is the start of Fairtrade Fortnight (25 February to 10 March) and this year’s theme is a real favourite of mine – yes, it’s chocolate.

For two weeks each year, thousands of people in the UK celebrate the people in poorer countries who grow our food and who are often exploited and badly paid.

For Fairtrade Fortnight 2019, we’re highlighting women cocoa farmers in the Cote d’Ivoire in West Africa. A typical cocoa farmer in Cote d’Ivoire is paid just 74p** a day (£1.86* is the amount needed each day in order to achieve a living income), and women have even fewer rights than men.

These are women who look after children, carry water, collect wood, cook and clean for the family and also plant and harvest on the farm and transport the cocoa beans to market. Without them we wouldn’t be able to get the chocolate we love so much and that’s why we’re campaigning for #SheDeserves so that women farmers are treated better. She Deserves running water, She Deserves a doctor, #SheDeserves a living income.

One of the easiest ways to support cocoa farmers is by buying Fairtrade certified chocolate and cocoa as it allows farmers to sell more of their cocoa at a fair price, which increases their income. Doing this helps women earn enough money to pay for essentials such as clothing, medicine and school fees for their children.

There are lots of other ways to help these women, from signing the petition to get the UK Government to address the poverty issue in our trade with developing countries to organising a fundraising event with your family, friends or colleagues.

You can find out more on the Fairtrade website here.

And when you’ve bought your Fairtrade goodies, you can turn them into a delicious chocolate mousse. This recipe features in my book, The Occasional Vegan, and it’s really easy to make. The surprise ingredient here is chickpea water, also known as aquafaba, which acts in the same way as egg whites and gives you a light and fluffy mousse.

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Chocolate mousse (photograph by Manon Houston)

Chocolate mousse

20-25 minutes, plus chilling time

Serves 2

 

Ingredients

150g dark Fairtrade chocolate

A dash of plant milk

120ml chickpea water

1 tsp vanilla extract

A pinch of sea salt (optional)

 

Carefully place a heatproof bowl over a pan of boiling water and add the chocolate and plant milk and stir gently until melted. Remove the bowl from the pan and set aside to cool slightly. If you have a microwave, heat the bowl on a medium power at 60-second intervals until melted.

Pour the chickpea water (one can should give you about 120ml water and you save the chickpeas for cooking something else) into a large bowl and whisk vigorously for 15 minutes, or until you have stiff peaks. This requires a strong wrist although you can use an electric whisk if you have one. To check if you have said stiff peaks, tilt the bowl slightly – if the water runs down the edge, you need to whisk more. When stiff, fold into the chocolate mixture then add the vanilla extract and the salt and stir well.

Pour into glasses or ramekins and leave in the fridge to set for at least an hour.

 

 

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Light at the end of the tunnel

We’re almost halfway through February, a short but (bitter)sweet month. It’s always been a happy time for me because it’s when I celebrate my birthday and it’s one step closer to the beginning of spring. By the end of February, it’ll be almost six o’clock before it gets dark, and just a month later, the clocks go forward and we’ll say hello to British Summer Time.

It might be a small and dark month, but its fruits (and vegetable) are handsome; ‘tis the season of blood oranges, purple sprouting broccoli and Jerusalem artichokes.

I’m pretty passionate about eating seasonally when possible because it’s tastier, better for the environment, and it’s often cheaper as well. Head to your local market (or even supermarket) and you’ll find local home-grown fruit and veg at a very reasonable price.

Back to those Jersusalem artichokes. These knobbly brown roots might not look very jolly, but they’re sweetly mellow and incredibly versatile. They’re not actually artichokes, but a type of sunflower, hence the name which is derived from girasole, the Italian word for those sunny shoots.

Jerusalem artichokes contain vitamin C, phosphorus and potassium, and are a good source of iron. They’re also very rich in inulin, a carbohydrate linked with good intestinal health due to its prebiotic properties.

You can eat them raw in a salad (try pairing them with apple or beetroot) or roast them like potatoes. Last week, I roasted them and made them into a light but velvety soup. The lemon adds a lovely bit of zing and you could add spinach if you wanted a bit of extra vitamin C.

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Roasted Jerusalem artichoke and lemon soup

 

Roasted Jerusalem artichoke and lemon soup

 

Serves 2

Ingredients

400-500g Jerusalem artichokes, peeled and roughly sliced

2 unwaxed lemons

1 medium onion, peeled and finely diced

500ml hot vegetable stock

Salt and pepper

Fresh basil leaves, roughly torn

Olive oil

 

Preheat the oven to 200C. Put the sliced artichokes into a large oven dish and pour over a generous glug of olive oil. Squeeze over the juice from the lemon halves then add them to the dish, and season. Place the dish on the top shelf of the oven and roast for about 45-50 minutes.

When cooked, remove from the oven and set aside. Heat some oil in a large pan and fry the onion for 5 minutes. Pour in the roasted artichokes and lemons (use a little boiling water to loosen the juices from the dish and use these as well) and cook for another 5 minutes. Pour over the hot stock, season, and bring to the boil. Reduce to a simmer, cover with a lid and then cook for another 10 minutes. Turn off the heat, remove the lemon halves from the pan and add the basil leaves, then blend with a hand blender. Serve with bread and a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil.